Goodbye Omelas

The revolution will be adorable.

Posts tagged History

46,566 notes

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

themightyglamazon:

gehayi:

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*
*clears throat*
there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 
like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)
there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop
so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 
no.
MARY
she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.
at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.
there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.
(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

We need links!
Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark
Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett
Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett
Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling
Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett
Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen
Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly
The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence
Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

deannawol:

Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

Reblogging for additional commentary

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

themightyglamazon:

gehayi:

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*

*clears throat*

there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 

like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)

there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop

so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 

no.

MARY

she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.

at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.

there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.

(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

We need links!

Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark

Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett

Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett

Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling

Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett

Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen

Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly

The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence

Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

deannawol:

Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

Reblogging for additional commentary

(via therotund)

Filed under History

115 notes

emilyonthewall:

Medieval First Wives Club
Featuring Royal Divorcees from before 1600:
Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter: separated from her first husband, Duke of Exeter, because he was fighting against her family in the Wars of the Roses (and was also a giant asshat). Now famous for providing DNA to match against Richard III’s remains.
Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France… then Queen of England: marriage with Louis VII, King of France, for various political reasons surrounding the 2nd Crusade.
Katherine of Aragon, Queen of England: forced to divorce from Henry VIII of England because he was a philandering pig. He basically changed the religion of his country to divorce her. A staunch Catholic, she never accepted it. 
(Please don’t give me a hard time about calling Kat A “medieval”… it was an artistic stretch borne of love!)
Message me if you want to discuss these ladies.

emilyonthewall:

Medieval First Wives Club

Featuring Royal Divorcees from before 1600:

Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter: separated from her first husband, Duke of Exeter, because he was fighting against her family in the Wars of the Roses (and was also a giant asshat). Now famous for providing DNA to match against Richard III’s remains.

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France… then Queen of England: marriage with Louis VII, King of France, for various political reasons surrounding the 2nd Crusade.

Katherine of Aragon, Queen of England: forced to divorce from Henry VIII of England because he was a philandering pig. He basically changed the religion of his country to divorce her. A staunch Catholic, she never accepted it. 

(Please don’t give me a hard time about calling Kat A “medieval”… it was an artistic stretch borne of love!)

Message me if you want to discuss these ladies.

(via gtfothinspo)

Filed under History

93,399 notes

sexymetalarm:

hungrylikethewolfie:

steamfitter:

yourpervert:


In 1808, Napoleon, running out of scenic holiday destinations to invade, somehow totally forgot about his neighbor to the south, Spain. So that year he dispatched his troops, kicking off the Peninsular War.
Only 20 years old and working as a barmaid in the town of Valdepenas, Juana Galan was not expecting a surge of French soldiers to come storming through her village. But on June 6, that’s exactly what happened. At that time, most of the men were fighting Napoleon’s forces elsewhere in the nation. Juana, unfazed by things like rifles and Frenchmen and French riflemen, began organizing the women in her village to form a trap for the approaching army.
When the army arrived, Juana and her friends were ready. They dumped boiling water and oil on the French troops, which by all accounts will instantly take the fight out of pretty much anyone. Then Juana, armed with only a batan, beat back the heavily armed French cavalry with her squad of village women, almost none of whom were armed with guns.
The French retreated, giving up on capturing not just Juana’s town but the entire province of La Mancha, leading to ultimate Spanish victory. Today, she is seen in Spain as a national hero, a symbol of resistance, strength, patriotism, feminism and hitting shit with a stick.
(x)

That’s one hell of a portrait.

hitting shit with a stick

This is maybe the best portrait of anyone that I’ve ever seen, ever.

If that portrait doesn’t scream “A hundred motherfuckers can’t tell me nothing” then I don’t know what does.

sexymetalarm:

hungrylikethewolfie:

steamfitter:

yourpervert:

In 1808, Napoleon, running out of scenic holiday destinations to invade, somehow totally forgot about his neighbor to the south, Spain. So that year he dispatched his troops, kicking off the Peninsular War.

Only 20 years old and working as a barmaid in the town of Valdepenas, Juana Galan was not expecting a surge of French soldiers to come storming through her village. But on June 6, that’s exactly what happened. At that time, most of the men were fighting Napoleon’s forces elsewhere in the nation. Juana, unfazed by things like rifles and Frenchmen and French riflemen, began organizing the women in her village to form a trap for the approaching army.

When the army arrived, Juana and her friends were ready. They dumped boiling water and oil on the French troops, which by all accounts will instantly take the fight out of pretty much anyone. Then Juana, armed with only a batan, beat back the heavily armed French cavalry with her squad of village women, almost none of whom were armed with guns.

The French retreated, giving up on capturing not just Juana’s town but the entire province of La Mancha, leading to ultimate Spanish victory. Today, she is seen in Spain as a national hero, a symbol of resistance, strength, patriotism, feminism and hitting shit with a stick.

(x)

That’s one hell of a portrait.

hitting shit with a stick

This is maybe the best portrait of anyone that I’ve ever seen, ever.

If that portrait doesn’t scream “A hundred motherfuckers can’t tell me nothing” then I don’t know what does.

(Source: lady-eboshi, via lyssamae)

Filed under History Badass

6,966 notes

pixieorsomething:

t45dpowerarmor:

bennyandfangs:

t45dpowerarmor:

lodubimvloyaar:

t45dpowerarmor:

I just read a poem that was written by a Jewish trans woman in 1322 I’m literally crying right now

Share?

http://www.transtorah.org/PDFs/On-Becoming-A-Woman.pdf

if you’re interested in reading it, this translation is closer to the original hebrew

James ily

(Source: teslaarmor, via hexgoddess)

Filed under Poetry Gender History Trans

293 notes

moodykittens asked: Is there any super bad-ass Catholic weapon around out there?

twentypercentcooler:

benito-cereno:

You mean besides the Spear of Longinus, which could cause empires to rise and fall?

There’s Ascalon, the lance (or in some versions, sword) that Saint George used to kill that dragon you might have heard about.

There was Joyeuse, the sword of Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne, which was said to contain bits of the Spear of Longinus in its pommel. 

Charlemagne’s paladin Roland had a sword called Durendal, which had in its hilt one of St Peter’s teeth, St Basil’s blood, a hair of St Denis, and a scrap of cloth that belonged to the Virgin Mary. It was said to be the sharpest sword that ever existed. (As long as I’m naming swords from the Song of Roland, Ogier the Dane’s magic sword was called the Courtain, and Almace was the sword of Turpin, Archbishop of Rheims.)

Saint Ferdinand III of Castile had a legendary sword called Lobera (“the wolf slayer”).

There’s the sword of Saint Peter, which he used to cut off the ear of a guard who came to arrest Jesus before the crucifixion, but it’s legend is not particularly badass, except in some legends it was given to Saint George, which is pretty cool except obviously he killed the dragon with that spear I was talking about a few paragraphs ago.

There’s the Sword of Mercy, which belonged to Edward the Confessor. It’s a sword with its tip broken off; it’s said an angel broke the tip off to prevent a wrongful killing. The sword remains today as part of the British Crown Jewels as a symbol of regal mercy.

More Judeo- than Christian, but the Seal of Solomon was a magical ring that King Solomon used to summon, control, and imprison demons.

There’s a few, anyway. I know they’re mostly swords, but I’m not aware of any Blessed C-4 out there (please do not say Holy Hand Grenade, nerds out there). Some of these might be of dubious Catholicity, but they all at least have something to do with a saint or a relic, so there you have it.

About half of these appear in a CastleVania game.

Filed under Weapons History