Goodbye Omelas

The revolution will be adorable.

Posts tagged History

2,308 notes

asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.

Padlock and Key, c 1580
Southern Germany, Steel

Helmet (Morion), c 1580
Northern Italy, Steel

Gauntlet, c 1580
Northern Italy, Steel

Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525
Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel

Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702
Germany – Steel, brass

Casket, c 1570-1600
Germany, Steelcartwork.

Cranequin, c 1565-1574
Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope

(via knitmeapony)

Filed under Art History Weapons

4,506 notes

realhistoricalpatterns:

Just to break things up briefly, here’s a really fascinating role of footage of Belle Époque ladies inspecting the new 1920s fashions. While I’m sure this was completely staged to just pick fun at BOTH generations, it’s still really fascinating to watch. Something to think about when you take a look at the patterns and how they progress through time!

(Source: unhistorical, via thefemme-menace)

Filed under History Fashion

10,914 notes

spaceandstuffidk:

lightthiscandle:

jump-suit:

asonlynasacan:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts 

I don’t know if this is true, but it’s hysterical

It is, and I am so happy.

So my first thought was, “Why did you bring a cat onto your plane?”, but then I read the excellent link from jump-suit, and learned that

the crew found (the cat) ‘more useful than any barometer. You must never cross the Atlantic in an airship without a cat,’ as Murray Simon put it.

Never cross the Atlantic in an airship without a cat - advice that we should all remember and take to heart.

This post just keeps getting better and better.

spaceandstuffidk:

lightthiscandle:

jump-suit:

asonlynasacan:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts

I don’t know if this is true, but it’s hysterical

It is, and I am so happy.

So my first thought was, “Why did you bring a cat onto your plane?”, but then I read the excellent link from jump-suit, and learned that

the crew found (the cat) ‘more useful than any barometer. You must never cross the Atlantic in an airship without a cat,’ as Murray Simon put it.

Never cross the Atlantic in an airship without a cat - advice that we should all remember and take to heart.

This post just keeps getting better and better.

(via knitmeapony)

Filed under History

8,610 notes

she-kicks-she-throws:

devildyke:

tamorapierce:

xkyaliix:

she-kicks-she-throws:

Photos from 1935 Japan via Old Photos of Japan.

Japanese school girls practicing naginata (薙刀). Naginata is a pole weapon traditionally used by members of the samurai class. It consists of a wooden shaft with a curved blade on the end. In the modern martial art form of naginata, it is carved from one piece of Japanese white oak or it features a replaceable blade constructed from bamboo. Practitioners wear protective armor called bogu (防具). It is very similar to the armor worn by practitioners of kendo. In modern Japan, naginatajutsu is practiced especially by women.

I’m gonna go out on a limb here and tag tamorapierce here because this is just too cool for words. 

And that limb held, `cos here I am, with thanks!

Look at them, at the easy grace with which they wait, at their focus on the weapon and beyond it, the opponent.

Thank you! I sit here in delighted fascination. :3

(via constellationsofjoy)

Filed under Weapons History

417 notes

victorianfanguide:

A lady’s archery scoring kit from the 1850s. It is made of ivory and silk ribbons and consists of an acorn-shaped cup containing a grease used to help the shooting gloves slide easily off the bowstring, a circular disc used to hold replaceable paper score sheets and a marker to write the score.
Archery was one of the few sports Victorian women could take part in, though it was extremely exclusive and only the wealthiest women could afford the equipment needed to join an archery club. These clubs had both male and female members and hosted competitions solely for women but also allowed them to compete directly against the men, although most women used smaller bows with a weaker draw strength than those used by the men. One woman who used the same strength bow as the men was Queenie Newall who went on to win the women’s archery gold medal at the 1908 Olympics.

victorianfanguide:

A lady’s archery scoring kit from the 1850s. It is made of ivory and silk ribbons and consists of an acorn-shaped cup containing a grease used to help the shooting gloves slide easily off the bowstring, a circular disc used to hold replaceable paper score sheets and a marker to write the score.

Archery was one of the few sports Victorian women could take part in, though it was extremely exclusive and only the wealthiest women could afford the equipment needed to join an archery club. These clubs had both male and female members and hosted competitions solely for women but also allowed them to compete directly against the men, although most women used smaller bows with a weaker draw strength than those used by the men. One woman who used the same strength bow as the men was Queenie Newall who went on to win the women’s archery gold medal at the 1908 Olympics.

(via constellationsofjoy)

Filed under Archery History Weapons

5,169 notes

dduane:

ancientart:

The Oldest Love Poem.

The world’s oldest known love poem. According to the Sumerian belief, it was a sacred duty for the king to marry every year a priestess instead of Inanna, the goddess of fertility and sexual love, in order to make the soil and women fertile. This poem was most probably written by a bride chosen for Shu-Sin in order to be sung at the New Year festival and it was sung at banquets and festivals accompanied by music and dance.
Its translation:
Bridegroom, dear to my heart,
Goodly is your beauty, honeysweet,
Lion, dear to my heart,
Goodly is your beauty, honeysweet.
[…]
Bridegroom, let me caress you,
My precious caress is more savory than honey,
In the bedchamber, honey-filled, In the bedchamber, honey-filled,
Let me enjoy your goodly beauty,
Lion, let me caress you,
My precious caress is more savory than honey.
Bridegroom, you have taken your pleasure of me,
Tell my mother, she will give you delicacies,
My father, he will give you gifts.
[…]
You, because you love me,
Give me pray of your caresses,
My lord god, my lord protector,
My SHU-SIN, who gladdens ENLIL’s heart,
Give me pray of your caresses. (x)

Courtesy & currently located at the Museum Of The Ancient Orient, Istanbul Archaeology Museums. Photo taken by Yuxuan Wang.

Whew.

dduane:

ancientart:

The Oldest Love Poem.

The world’s oldest known love poem. According to the Sumerian belief, it was a sacred duty for the king to marry every year a priestess instead of Inanna, the goddess of fertility and sexual love, in order to make the soil and women fertile. This poem was most probably written by a bride chosen for Shu-Sin in order to be sung at the New Year festival and it was sung at banquets and festivals accompanied by music and dance.

Its translation:

Bridegroom, dear to my heart,

Goodly is your beauty, honeysweet,

Lion, dear to my heart,

Goodly is your beauty, honeysweet.

[…]

Bridegroom, let me caress you,

My precious caress is more savory than honey,

In the bedchamber, honey-filled, In the bedchamber, honey-filled,

Let me enjoy your goodly beauty,

Lion, let me caress you,

My precious caress is more savory than honey.

Bridegroom, you have taken your pleasure of me,

Tell my mother, she will give you delicacies,

My father, he will give you gifts.

[…]

You, because you love me,

Give me pray of your caresses,

My lord god, my lord protector,

My SHU-SIN, who gladdens ENLIL’s heart,

Give me pray of your caresses. (x)

Courtesy & currently located at the Museum Of The Ancient Orient, Istanbul Archaeology Museums. Photo taken by Yuxuan Wang.

Whew.

(via carnivaloftherandom)

Filed under Poetry History