Goodbye Omelas

The revolution will be adorable.

Posts tagged Islam

63,625 notes

superawesomephoenix:

blackamazon:

searchingforknowledge:

note-a-bear:

thegoddamazon:

dionthesocialist:

Just that simple.

Basically.

I need people to understand that being “irreverent” doesn’t equate to being a racist doucheknuckle. As in, this man manages to be both reflexive AND irreverent.

god i was bracing for fuckery and this dude delivered sense-making. Thanks dude for being decent. 

who is this man!

Dara O’Briain. He’s on Mock the Week and School of Hard Sums. He’s pretty awesome.

(Source: bouncingdodecahedrons, via thatfeministwithglasses)

Filed under Religion Islam lol

9,046 notes

phytos:

The Shah Mosque of Isfahan

Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian Architecture. The Shah Mosque of Esfahan is one of the everlasting masterpieces of architecture in Iran. It is registered, along with the Naghsh-i Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its construction began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions.

Photograph 1 by: Omid Jafarnezhad

Photographs 2 - 6 by: ‘Horizon’ on Flickr.

(Source: blue-voids, via iamthecrime)

Filed under Art Islam Iran

1,828 notes

mehreenkasana:

themindislimitless:

themindislimitless:

kosmonaunt:

Fatima Al-Fihriyya Art Nouveau by *Nayzak

Excerpt of Meet Fatima Al-Fihri - An Inspiration:

Twelve hundred years ago, under the Islamic State, a woman named Fatima Al-Fihri lived to make life for her community better and was a woman with a vision. She was from a prestigious family and had inherited a fortune from her father. As a young, wealthy and well educated woman her interest was neither in shoes or handbags, nor in any celebrity lifestyle, neither to woe a man for marriage, nor in any of the stereotypes that are usually associated with us women folk. There was depth in this woman, she had a vision that was cultivated and allowed to grow because of the Islamic society she lived in and encouraged her. Her vision did not remain a dream but was accomplished and the results can still be seen today. In 859, Fatima Al-Fihri founded the oldest academic degree-granting university existing today, the University of Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco.
The Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque is one of the largest Masjids (mosque) in Africa and one of the world’s oldest universities. Al-Qarawiyyin is the perfect example of how Islam combines the spiritual with education and that Islam is not separate from life’s affairs. This is not only an example of how education and religion merge in this small corner of the globe, but it sheds light on the esteemed role that women played in the Islamic community - an aspect of Islam that is often misunderstood. Furthermore, during medieval times it was regarded as being a major intellectual centre in the Mediterranean. Its excellent reputation even led to Gerber of Auvergne studying at the mosque. Auvergne later went on to become Pope Sylvester II and has been given the credit of introducing Arabic numerals and the zero to the rest of Europe.

Although Fatima Al-Fihriyya is an inspiration and a powerful symbol of empowerment for many Muslimahs, she is also a sad reminder of how much the Muslim community over the world has disintegrated from their ideals. Where women once were encouraged, and actually took high places in society and did many amazing things both for their time and the generations that would come after, the women in present day society have been subjected to years of oppression from a patriarchy that wants them “in their place”, of governments, rulers, systems that seek only to exploit them and make money for themselves while leaving behind and trampling down on the ones who enabled them to be great. Well, woman have great minds and are capable of great things, and our “place” is out in the world. It is out and doing things that matter, it is out and changing the world, it is doing things that we have a right to do, and it is a matter for every woman to reclaim those rights.
THIS is what Islam means for women to do. Know your rights.

I see this post going around and people talking about how there’s nothing on her on Wikipedia, so I’m reblogging this for that excerpt up there for people to start on her. And then continue reading up on her here.

One of my Muslim women ideals: Fatima Al-Fihriyya.

mehreenkasana:

themindislimitless:

themindislimitless:

kosmonaunt:

Fatima Al-Fihriyya Art Nouveau by *Nayzak

Excerpt of Meet Fatima Al-Fihri - An Inspiration:

Twelve hundred years ago, under the Islamic State, a woman named Fatima Al-Fihri lived to make life for her community better and was a woman with a vision. She was from a prestigious family and had inherited a fortune from her father. As a young, wealthy and well educated woman her interest was neither in shoes or handbags, nor in any celebrity lifestyle, neither to woe a man for marriage, nor in any of the stereotypes that are usually associated with us women folk. There was depth in this woman, she had a vision that was cultivated and allowed to grow because of the Islamic society she lived in and encouraged her. Her vision did not remain a dream but was accomplished and the results can still be seen today. In 859, Fatima Al-Fihri founded the oldest academic degree-granting university existing today, the University of Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco.

The Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque is one of the largest Masjids (mosque) in Africa and one of the world’s oldest universities. Al-Qarawiyyin is the perfect example of how Islam combines the spiritual with education and that Islam is not separate from life’s affairs. This is not only an example of how education and religion merge in this small corner of the globe, but it sheds light on the esteemed role that women played in the Islamic community - an aspect of Islam that is often misunderstood. Furthermore, during medieval times it was regarded as being a major intellectual centre in the Mediterranean. Its excellent reputation even led to Gerber of Auvergne studying at the mosque. Auvergne later went on to become Pope Sylvester II and has been given the credit of introducing Arabic numerals and the zero to the rest of Europe.

Although Fatima Al-Fihriyya is an inspiration and a powerful symbol of empowerment for many Muslimahs, she is also a sad reminder of how much the Muslim community over the world has disintegrated from their ideals. Where women once were encouraged, and actually took high places in society and did many amazing things both for their time and the generations that would come after, the women in present day society have been subjected to years of oppression from a patriarchy that wants them “in their place”, of governments, rulers, systems that seek only to exploit them and make money for themselves while leaving behind and trampling down on the ones who enabled them to be great. Well, woman have great minds and are capable of great things, and our “place” is out in the world. It is out and doing things that matter, it is out and changing the world, it is doing things that we have a right to do, and it is a matter for every woman to reclaim those rights.

THIS is what Islam means for women to do. Know your rights.

I see this post going around and people talking about how there’s nothing on her on Wikipedia, so I’m reblogging this for that excerpt up there for people to start on her. And then continue reading up on her here.

One of my Muslim women ideals: Fatima Al-Fihriyya.

Filed under Islam HBIC

1,066 notes

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

faineemae:

agonyoftheleaves:

orientalismisalive:

niqabsandkitaabs:

Kitaabgasm.
“Book covers promote Orientalist portrayal of Muslim women”
http://www.arabglot.com/2011/05/book-covers-promote-orientalist.html (via @arablit)

Head covering? Check. Dark kohl? Check. Narrowed gaze of defiance? Check. Juxtaposed with a helpless look too? Check. Tasteless veil pun for the dozenth time? Check.
Wonderful. Now you know all you need to about Muslim women. Here’s your oriental cookie.

every time i see a spread like this i cringe.
‘there is no racism in the book world’, my ass.

Damn, this showed up again on my dash, I guess I have to post these again.




because they are ALL OPPRESSED OKAY

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

faineemae:

agonyoftheleaves:

orientalismisalive:

niqabsandkitaabs:

Kitaabgasm.

“Book covers promote Orientalist portrayal of Muslim women”

http://www.arabglot.com/2011/05/book-covers-promote-orientalist.html (via @arablit)

Head covering? Check. Dark kohl? Check. Narrowed gaze of defiance? Check. Juxtaposed with a helpless look too? Check. Tasteless veil pun for the dozenth time? Check.

Wonderful. Now you know all you need to about Muslim women. Here’s your oriental cookie.

every time i see a spread like this i cringe.

‘there is no racism in the book world’, my ass.

Damn, this showed up again on my dash, I guess I have to post these again.

because they are ALL OPPRESSED OKAY

(via ethiopienne)

Filed under Islam Islamophobia Orientalism Hijab

679 notes

badesaba:

Baroness Marie-Thérèse Ullens de Schooten (1905-1989, Belgium) traveled widely over the course of her husband’s diplomatic career, visiting Egypt in the 1920s and Iran in 1948, among other destinations.

these are some of her photographs taken at :  Madar-e Shah Madrasa, Isfahan, Iran 


(via agonyoftheleaves)

Filed under Islam Architecture

1,139 notes

Wrong:
Muslim women are forced to wear that thing on their head! It's a form of oppression!
Wrong:
No Muslim women are forced to wear a hijab on their head! It is never a form of oppression!
Right:
Some Muslim women wear hijab as a sign of modesty and it is a choice they made on their own. The hijab doesn't oppress them, ignorance does. At the same time, some Muslim women are forced to wear hijab and it is a form of oppression that is not preached within our religion. God created us with the ability to choose or not choose what we do or don't do, that right should not be swept under the rug by family or government. Whether you believe hijab to be obligatory or not, you should not believe that women shouldn't have a say in whether they wear it or not.

Filed under Islam Hijab Islamophobia