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Posts tagged Math

354 notes

proofmathisbeautiful:

Via PolicyMic

Movies like Goodwill Hunting and A Beautiful Mind have helped us all to appreciate the beauty of mathematics in a similar way to art. New research by University College London shows that this might not just be due to good cinematography, but because our brains actually do respond to beautiful equations in the same way that they respond to great paintings or masterful music.

The study involved giving 15 mathematicians 60 different formula to assess, while measuring their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The result? This was rated the most beautiful equation:

Euler’s identity

And this, the most ugly:

Ramanujan’s infinite series

Interestingly, when you look at them it isn’t hard for those of us who are not mathematicians to see why. The former explains complex elements within a simple framework. The latter is long and messy.

The fMRI results show that the medial orbito-frontal cortex region of the brain increases in activity in response to pleasing equations. This is the very same area of the brain that fires when people see or hear an appealing work of art such as a Mozart, Shakespeare or Van Gogh. So it seems that the brain appreciates all beauty in the same way, no matter what form it comes in.

The beauty of math: If you’re still not convinced that equations can be as beautiful as other forms of art, you might want to check out this stunning video that Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux have put together. The film presents everyday events as described by math, and shows an equation on the left, a diagram in the middle, and real-life version on the right.

Although some artistic liberties are taken and not everything here represents perfect science, the piece brilliantly achieves its goal of showing people that “mathematics aren’t that abstract useless concept that we often find it to be when we study it at school,” Pineill told Fast Co.Design. “It’s an awesome universal language that is the foundation of every science and thus the tool to understand fully every single thing around us.”

Filed under Math Art

91,345 notes

positivebeatsthenegative:

cardiocutie:

Guys you don’t understand how awesome this is. This pattern happens everywhere. It happens on flowers and pinecones absolutely vegetables, it happens all around you. If you don’t think that’s like the realist shit ever i don’t understand you.It’s insane how the universe is literally full of beauty to the point that we can’t even see some of it. Beautiful down to the way it moves.

this is so cool

positivebeatsthenegative:

cardiocutie:

Guys you don’t understand how awesome this is. This pattern happens everywhere. It happens on flowers and pinecones absolutely vegetables, it happens all around you. If you don’t think that’s like the realist shit ever i don’t understand you.It’s insane how the universe is literally full of beauty to the point that we can’t even see some of it. Beautiful down to the way it moves.

this is so cool

(via thefemme-menace)

Filed under Math

82,899 notes

angrywomenofcolorunited:

Today Google celebrates Shakuntala Devi’s 84th birthday.  She was popularly known as the “Human Computer”, was a child prodigy, and mental calculator. She passed away on April 21 2013, she was 83 years old. Her achievements include:

  • In 1977 in the USA she competed with a computer to see who could calculate the cube root of 188,132,517 faster (she won). That same year, at the Southern Methodist University she was asked to give the 23rd root of a 201-digit number; she answered in 50 seconds. Her answer—546,372,891—was confirmed by calculations done at the U.S. Bureau of Standards by the Univac 1101 computer, for which a special program had to be written to perform such a large calculation.
  • On June 18, 1980, she demonstrated the multiplication of two 13-digit numbers 7,686,369,774,870 × 2,465,099,745,779 picked at random by the Computer Department of Imperial College, London. She correctly answered 18,947,668,177,995,426,462,773,730 in 28 seconds. This event is mentioned in the 1982 Guinness Book of Records.

Happy birthday Shakuntala!

(via golden-zephyr-deactivated201401)

Filed under Badass Math

4,255 notes

scinerds:

The GIF above is an animation of a fractal tree, one of the simplest fractals! (simple meaning you can actually draw it without computer aid)
The basis of a fractal is a pattern repeating itself. Sometimes looking exactly the same no matter how close you zoom in on a chosen area. The most popular example of this being the Mandelbrot Fractal. (look up a video of the fractal, you can stare at it for hours — it’ll still be the same)
"Beautiful, damn hard, increasingly useful, thats fractals." - Pierre Mandelbrot

scinerds:

The GIF above is an animation of a fractal tree, one of the simplest fractals! (simple meaning you can actually draw it without computer aid)

The basis of a fractal is a pattern repeating itself. Sometimes looking exactly the same no matter how close you zoom in on a chosen area. The most popular example of this being the Mandelbrot Fractal. (look up a video of the fractal, you can stare at it for hours — it’ll still be the same)

"Beautiful, damn hard, increasingly useful, thats fractals." - Pierre Mandelbrot

Filed under Math

3,247 notes

scinerds:

This is a tesseract. Which is known as the 3 dimensional shadow of what a cube existing within 4 dimensions would look like. The tesseract is shown in a virtually 3-dimensional state in the GIF, and in 2-dimensional state in the bottom image.

It is really really hard to imagine the 4th dimension, living within 3 dimensions so the tesseract gives us the best representation we can imagine with our human brains. 

(Images from Wikipedia Commons)

Filed under 'Tell me my dear have you ever heard of a tesseract?' Science! Math