Goodbye Omelas

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Posts tagged Theatre

64 notes

Anonymous asked: What fandoms do you think Shakespeare would be in?

jabletown:

haha Game of Thrones definitely. Hannibal. House of Cards. But probably a bigger fan of ~low camp~ media like Scandal and Sparticus. Distinguishing between high and low camp shows seems kinda pointless in today’s media considering the themes and writing of some of our prestige television, like GoT.

But obviously anything salacious would be right up his alley. Hey-oooooo. Sexual.

Not just that. He’d be downtown, in sketchy diners and dive bars, anything cheap and open late- the places you go when you get out of rehearsal after your 10/12. He’d be in the audiences at shows put on by students and amateurs and out-of-work actors who somehow scraped up enough money to rent a warehouse and a few Source 4s, with set pieces that come half from landfills and half from people’s crappy fifth-floor flats. Shows they wrote themselves, or maybe something public domain. Maybe sometimes, when he had the cash, he’d see something uptown- but that’s a different beast of theatre, when you’ve got a budget and union actors and crew. The energy is different. I like to think he’d mostly stick to the margins. Sure, a lot of it is crap- a lot of Shakespeare is crap. But damn, when it’s good, it’s great, and that’s not something that’s substantially different from Renaissance London.

Filed under Shakespeare Theatre

435,238 notes

spectaculacular-sammy:

pau-ii:

obstreperous-honey:

encontrate:

thisispureinsanity:

candlejack:



WHAT IS THIS
WHAT IS THIS
WHAT
IS THIS A LIBRARY IN A THEATRE
ALL OF MY DREAMS HAVE JUST COME TRUE


oh. oh my god.

this is genuinely the most beautiful thing i have ever seen

This is a book store called El Ateneo in Buenos Aires, Argentina! You can have coffee while sitting on the stage. One of my favorite places in my city.

It’s a BOOKSTORE?!


there are balconies where you can sit to read too 

and that’s the stage where you can have a coffee :)


This is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen.

spectaculacular-sammy:

pau-ii:

obstreperous-honey:

encontrate:

thisispureinsanity:

candlejack:

WHAT IS THIS

WHAT IS THIS

WHAT

IS THIS A LIBRARY IN A THEATRE

ALL OF MY DREAMS HAVE JUST COME TRUE

oh. oh my god.

this is genuinely the most beautiful thing i have ever seen

This is a book store called El Ateneo in Buenos Aires, Argentina! You can have coffee while sitting on the stage. One of my favorite places in my city.

It’s a BOOKSTORE?!

image

there are balconies where you can sit to read too 

image

and that’s the stage where you can have a coffee :)

image

This is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen.

(Source: billions-of-stars, via karlsparxxx)

Filed under THAT'S FINE I DON'T NEED MONEY Libraries Books Theatre

82,352 notes

MOTHERFUCKING THEATRE ETIQUETTE TIPS

bluhbluhhugedork:

burnedoffwings:

prose-b4bros:

1. Wear your motherfucking best clothes—it shows the actors that you think their performance is worth dressing up for.

2. Shut the fuck up—Don’t fucking open that hole on your face while the show is taking place.

3. Put your motherfucking cell phone away—that’s fucking rude and I really shouldn’t have to explain why

4.
DO. NOT. LEAVE. DURING. BOWS.

5. KEEP YOUR FUCKING FEET OFF THE GOD DAMN SEATS

(Source: cloktwerkorange, via somanybadcustomers)

Filed under Theatre

5,938 notes

How Different Theatre People React to Shows

Actors:
That was really deep, and the actors really spoke to me as an audience member.
Costumers:
That quick change, I know how they pulled that off, it was really clever. But what the hell was up with their choice of shoes?!
Light Board Op:
Why the hell did they light up a section of audience for no reason?
Stage Crew:
I see the how they did the set changes.
Sound Op:
Where'd they get that sound effect from? I want it.
Stage Manager:
I noticed all the things. Especially that there was a platform in the back that should've been painted black.

Filed under fear the SMs Theatre

36,368 notes

Here’s a basic rule: if you’re reading or watching a Shakespeare play, and you’re not imagining the actors standing in front of a mosh pit of jeering Londoners waiting to throw vegetables at the stage, you’re doing it wrong.

Shakespeare might have written the best works in the English language, or given us profound insight into the nature of humanity, or whatever — but his works wouldn’t have survived to our day if he hadn’t been popular when he was alive, and he wouldn’t have been popular when he was alive if he hadn’t been able to please the crowd. And that includes a lot of dirty jokes. A lot.

Sometimes in incredibly inappropriate places. We’re here to rescue a few of those for you, and retroactively embarrass the heck out of your fourteen-year-old self, who had to stand up in English class and read things that, in retrospect, are absolutely filthy.

This isn’t about the stuff that always does crack fourteen-year-olds up in English class, but is totally innocent: the “bring me my long sword, ho!” sort of thing.

But the kids who lose it every time the word “ho” is uttered are closer to the spirit of Shakespeare than the teacher who demands they treat the words like museum pieces.

Sure, it would be awkward for teachers to explain the Elizabethan double entendres to their students — but pretending they don’t exist makes Shakespeare seem unnecessarily stuffy and difficult.

So we’re going to start with the most obvious innuendoes, and move on to some seriously advanced sex punnery that is probably going to blow your mind.

Reading Shakespeare without the sex jokes is the real tragedy. (via newsweek)

(via teacoffeebooks)

Filed under AMEN Shakespeare Theatre

14,777 notes

When we took Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” into a maximum security woman’s prison on the West Side… there’s a scene there where a young woman is told by a very powerful official that “If you sleep with me, I will pardon your brother. And if you don’t sleep with me, I’ll execute him.” And he leaves the stage. And this character, Isabel, turned out to the audience and said: “To whom should I complain?” And a woman in the audience shouted: “The Police!” And then she looked right at that woman and said: “If I did relate this, who would believe me?” And the woman answered back, “No one, girl.” And it was astonishing because not only was it an amazing sense of connection between the audience and the actress, but you also realized that this was a kind of an historical lesson in theater reception. That’s what must have happened at The Globe. These soliloquies were not simply monologues that people spoke, they were call and response to the audience. And you realized that vibrancy, that that sense of connectedness is not only what makes theater great in prisons, it’s what makes theater great, period.
Oskar Eustis on ArtBeat Nation (he told the same story on Charlie Rose)

(Source: neverwasastoryofmorewhoa, via knitmeapony)

Filed under Shakespeare Measure for Measure Theatre

12,471 notes

Years and years ago, there was a production of The Tempest, out of doors, at an Oxford college on a lawn, which was the stage, and the lawn went back towards the lake in the grounds of the college, and the play began in natural light. But as it developed, and as it became time for Ariel to say his farewell to the world of The Tempest, the evening had started to close in and there was some artificial lighting coming on. And as Ariel uttered his last speech, he turned and he ran across the grass, and he got to the edge of the lake and he just kept running across the top of the water — the producer having thoughtfully provided a kind of walkway an inch beneath the water. And you could see and you could hear the plish, plash as he ran away from you across the top of the lake, until the gloom enveloped him and he disappeared from your view.

And as he did so, from the further shore, a firework rocket was ignited, and it went whoosh into the air, and high up there it burst into lots of sparks, and all the sparks went out, and he had gone.

When you look up the stage directions, it says, ‘Exit Ariel.’

Tom Stoppard, University of Pennsylvania, 1996 (via flameintobeing)

(via knitmeapony)

Filed under and that kids is why live theatre will never go away Theatre Shakespeare The Tempest